Video: Webinar on Configural Frequency Analysis

November 14, 2019:

Watch the video of our most recent webinar, “Person-Centered Methods: An Alternative Statistical Approach.” In this 90+ minute video, Mark Stemmler, professor of psychological assessment at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany, and author of the book Person centered methods: Configural frequency analysis (CFA), introduces CFA. The webinar took place on October 31, 2019.

CFA is a data analysis method that can detect patterns that occur more or less often than would be expected to occur according to a prespecified null hypothesis. CFA is applicable across many fields, but in human development, researchers apply it to examine multiple behaviors and determine which patterns correlate to healthy or unhealthy development. This statistical tool can be applied to categorical variables; in addition also continuous variables can be used as covariates.

Watch the video on YouTube.

Free Webinar on Configural Frequency Analysis

Mark Stemmler holding his bookJuly 10, 2019:

Configural frequency analysis (CFA) is a data analysis method that can detect patterns that occur more or less often than would be expected to occur according to a prespecified null hypothesis. CFA is applicable across many fields, but in human development, researchers apply it to examine multiple behaviors and determine which patterns correlate to healthy or unhealthy development. This statistical tool can be applied to categorical variables; in addition also continuous variables can be used as covariates.

Mark Stemmler, professor of psychological assessment at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany, and author of the book Person centered methods: Configural frequency analysis (CFA), will be visiting The Methodology Center this fall. On Thursday, October 31, from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. ET, Mark will present a 1 & 1 webinar on CFA. 1 & 1 webinars consist of a one-hour live video presentation on a method followed by a one-hour question-and-answer session with the presenter. CFA is easily performed through an R-package called confreq. The use of confreq will be demonstrated. To join the webinar, click psu.zoom.us/j/896104435 when the webinar is starting. Registration in advance is not necessary.

Questions? Email: MChelpdesk@psu.edu

Video: Two-Hour Webinar on Latent Class Analysis (LCA)

March 19, 2019:

 

Thanks to all who participated in our 1 & 1 workshop on latent class analysis (LCA). This is a video of the webinar that Methodology Center Associate Director Bethany Bray presented on Thursday, February 26, 2019. The video includes both the one-hour presentation and the one-hour question-and-answer session that followed. This recording is a great way to learn the basics of LCA or to use as a refresher.

Download the presentation slides.

Watch the video on YouTube.

Free, Two-Hour, Online Workshop on Micro-Randomized Trials

April 10, 2018:susanm

For our next 1 & 1 workshop, Methodology Center Investigator Susan Murphy will present an introduction to the micro-randomized trial (MRT). 1 & 1 workshops consist of a one-hour live video presentation on a method followed by a one-hour question-and-answer session with the presenter. After the presentation, Susan will accept questions via instant message and answer them live. The workshop will be held on Thursday, June 14, from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

In an MRT, individuals are randomized hundreds or thousands of times over the course of a study. The goal of these trials is to assess the proximal, in-the-moment, impact of interventions (e.g., interventions that are intended to impact behavior over small time intervals). Through MRTs we can gather data to build optimized just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs). A JITAI is a special type of adaptive intervention that can be delivered exactly when and where it is needed using smartphones and other mobile devices for their sensors and ability to communicate with patients.

The 1 & 1 will be hosted via Zoom webinar at https://psu.zoom.us/j/992577418. The workshop can accommodate up to 500 participants, so all interested people should be able to attend. If you try to attend the workshop but are unable to log on for any reason, please send an email to mchelpdesk@psu.edu. We hope you will join us.

Video: Two-Hour Webinar on Latent Transition Analysis

April 10, 2018:

Thanks to all who participated in our 1 & 1 workshop on latent transition analysis (LTA). This is a video of the webinar that Methodology Center Associate Director Bethany Bray presented on Thursday, March 29, 2018. The video includes both the one-hour presentation and the one-hour question-and-answer session that followed. This recording is a great way to learn the basics of LTA.

We will continue to host more 1 & 1 workshops. Our next 1 & 1 will be on Thursday, June 14, from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time, when Methodology Center Investigator Susan Murphy presents an introduction to the micro-randomized trial.

Watch the video on YouTube.

Free, Two-Hour, Online Workshop on Latent Transition Analysis

February 9, 2018:online workshop lta

For our next 1 & 1 workshop, Methodology Center Associate Director Bethany Bray will present an introduction to latent transition analysis (LTA). 1 & 1 workshops consist of a one-hour live video presentation on a method followed by a one-hour question-and-answer session with the presenter. After the presentation, Bethany will accept questions via instant message and answer them live. The workshop will be held on Thursday, March 29, from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. ET.

LTA and latent class analysis (LCA) are closely related methods. LCA identifies unobservable (latent) subgroups within a population based on individuals’ responses to multiple observed variables. LTA is an extension of LCA that uses longitudinal data to identify movement between the subgroups over time. Workshop participants should possess basic familiarity with LCA before attending. For an introduction to LCA, see Collins and Lanza (2010) or Lanza, Bray, and Collins (2013).

The 1 & 1 will be hosted via Zoom webinar at https://psu.zoom.us/j/618654311. The workshop can accommodate up to 500 participants, so all interested people should be able to attend. If you try to attend the workshop but are unable to log on for any reason, please send an email to mchelpdesk@psu.edu. We hope you will join us.

References

Collins, L. M., & Lanza, S. T. (2010). Latent class and latent transition analysis: With applications in the social, behavioral, and health sciences. New York: Wiley.

Lanza, S. T., Bray, B. C., & Collins, L. M. (2013). An introduction to latent class and latent transition analysis. In J. A. Schinka, W. F. Velicer, & I. B. Weiner (Eds.), Handbook of psychology (2nd ed.,Vol. 2, pp. 691-716). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Free, Two-Hour, Online Workshop About MOST

October 10, 2017:lmc

For our next 1 & 1, Methodology Center Director Linda Collins will present an introduction to the multiphase optimization strategy (MOST) for optimizing interventions on Tuesday, November 14, from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. Log in at https://psu.zoom.us/j/5379178158. 1 & 1 workshops consist of a one-hour live video presentation on a method followed by a one-hour question-and-answer session with the presenter. After the presentation, Linda will accept questions via instant message and answer them live. This is a great opportunity to learn about the value of MOST and ask questions about planning a MOST or writing a grant proposal for a study that follows MOST.

About MOST

MOST is an engineering-inspired framework for optimizing and evaluating behavioral, biobehavioral, and biomedical interventions. MOST emphasizes efficiency and careful management of resources to move intervention science forward systematically. MOST can be used to guide the evaluation of research evidence, develop optimized interventions, and enhance Type I and Type II translation of research. Read more.

About 1 & 1

The 1 & 1 will be hosted via Zoom video conference. Login information will be posted on the 1 & 1 access page the day before the workshop. The workshop will be limited to 50 participants, who will be admitted on a first-come, first-served basis when they log on to the video conference the day of the workshop. If you try to attend the workshop but are unable to log on for any reason, please send an email to mchelpdesk@psu.edu. We hope you will join us to explore MOST and have Linda answer your questions directly in real time.

 

Read more about MOST.

Watch the video of our 1 & 1 on time-varying effect modeling.

Learn TVEM: Free, Two-Hour, Online Workshop

January 17, 2017:
Steph presents
We are excited to announce a new series of online workshops. Our 1 & 1 workshops will consist of a one-hour live video presentation on a method followed by a one-hour question-and-answer session with the presenter (and possibly other experts). For our first 1 & 1, Methodology Center Scientific Director Stephanie Lanza will present an introduction to time-varying effect modeling (TVEM) on Tuesday, February 21st, from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. After the presentation, she will accept questions via instant message and will answer them through the video connection. This is a great opportunity to learn about the value of TVEM and ask questions to one of the pioneers of applying TVEM to health and behavioral data.

About TVEM

TVEM allows scientists to understand the way relationships change over time. An extension of linear regression, TVEM allows the relationship between two variables to be modeled without making assumptions about the nature of the relationship. The method is flexible enough to be used with many different types of data and can add the dimension of time to analyses where measuring change over time was previously not possible. Read more.

About 1 & 1

The 1 & 1 will be hosted via Zoom video conference at https://zoom.us/j/5379178158. The workshop will be limited to 50 participants, who will be admitted on a first-come, first-served basis when they log on to the video conference the day of the workshop. If you try to attend the workshop but are unable to log on for any reason, please send an email to mchelpdesk@psu.edu. We hope you will join us to explore this method and our newest way to help researchers adopt cutting-edge research methods.