Principal Investigators’ New Websites

May 6, 2020:

Stephanie Lanza, Bethany Bray, Linda Collins, Susan Murphy, Runze LiAs previously announced, substantial changes lie ahead for The Methodology Center. Over the coming months, we will stop updating this website. Resources will remain available for at least a year, but in order to provide the latest information, each of our investigators will maintain her or his own website. These sites will include content developed at The Methodology Center and new resources related to the researcher’s future work.

Stephanie Lanza and Ashley Linden-Carmichael built a website for the Addictions and Innovative Methods (AIM) lab. Their great new site, https://aimlab.psu.edu/, describes their research and includes the content about time-varying effect modeling (TVEM) from The Methodology Center’s website.

Susan Murphy has incorporated The Methodology Center’s content on just-in-time adaptive interventions in her website, http://people.seas.harvard.edu/~samurphy/. The site also includes workshop materials and other resources.

Bethany Bray‘s new site at https://bcbray.com/ will include The Methodology Center’s resources for latent class analysis (LCA) and latent transition analysis (LTA). Bethany has concrete plans for new LCA and LTA resources, so stay tuned.

Runze Li will update his page at http://personal.psu.edu/ril4/ to incorporate Methodology Center resources on variable screening and variable selection for high-dimensional data analysis.

Linda Collins will build a new website to house The Methodology Center’s content on the multiphase optimization strategy (MOST) for optimizing interventions after she moves to New York University. In the meantime, follow Linda on Twitter, @collins_most.

Daniel Almirall and Inbal “Billie” Nahum-Shani’s informative website, https://d3lab.isr.umich.edu, will soon incorporate The Methodology Center’s resources for the sequential, multiple assignment, randomized trial (SMART).

More information will follow in June or July. Thank you for staying connected to our research! We are all proud of our time at The Methodology Center and very excited about the future.

Summer Institute Postponed

April 7, 2020: 

Susan Murphy and Daniel Almirall

UPDATE: The Summer Institute will be held on  June 28-29, 2021.

The planning committee for the Summer Institute has been monitoring closely the latest guidelines and announcements related to COVID-19. After much consideration and with the health, safety, and well-being of everyone involved with the Summer Institute as our priorities, the 2020 Summer Institute on Innovative Methods has been postponed. The Summer Institute will not be held July 23-24, 2020.

The Summer Institute on Building Effective Just-in-Time Adaptive Interventions Using Micro-Randomized Trial Designs with Susan Murphy and Daniel Almirall will be offered at a later date. The planning committee,  instructors, and the National Institute on Drug Abuse will collaborate to find new dates.

This decision was made prior to acceptances being sent for the institute. Those who applied will not need to resubmit an application once new dates are announced. If you have questions or concerns, please contact Claire Corcoran at cbridg4@uic.edu.

Apply Now: Summer Institute on Just-in-Time Adaptive Interventions

Susan Murphy and Daniel AlmirallJanuary 23, 2020:

Apply now to attend this year’s Summer Institute on Innovative Methods, “Building effective just-in-time adaptive interventions using micro-randomized trial designs.” Susan Murphy, professor of statistics and computer science and Radcliffe Alumnae Professor at Harvard University, and Daniel Almirall, research associate professor at The University of Michigan’s Survey Research Center, will introduce the just-in-time adaptive intervention (JITAI) and micro-randomized trial (MRT) for the development of adaptive mobile health interventions. The Institute will be held July 23 – 24 in Bethesda Maryland.

JITAIs are a special type of adaptive intervention where—thanks to mobile technology like activity sensors and smartphones—an intervention can be delivered when and where it is needed. MRTs are a new trial design for addressing scientific questions concerning the construction of highly effective JITAIs. In this workshop, we will introduce JITAIs and provide examples of key scientific questions can be answered using MRTs. Useful primary aim data analysis methods for MRTs will also be discussed.

Day 1 and part of Day 2 of this workshop will focus on JITAI and MRT design considerations and applications. Much of Day 2 will be allotted to understanding primary aims in an MRT and conducting associated primary aim analyses.

The 2020 Summer Institute on Innovative Methods is hosted as a partnership between The Methodology Center at Penn State and the Center for Dissemination and Implementation Science at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Read more or apply to attend.

Frequently Asked Questions about Micro-Randomized Trials (MRTs)

blank sample MRT schematicJanuary 17, 2019:

In micro-randomized trials (MRTs), individuals are randomized hundreds or thousands of times over the course of the study. The goal of these trials is to optimize mobile health interventions by assessing the effect of intervention components and assessing whether the intervention component effects vary with time or an individual’s current context. In an effort to help researchers understand MRTs, we have developed a list of answers to frequently asked questions about these trials. This webpage can be used to answer your specific questions, or you can read the entire page to understand the use and design of MRTs. ​

Open the FAQ.

Video: Webinar on Analysis of Data From an MRT

September 20, 2018:

Thanks to all who participated in our 1 & 1 workshop on analysis of data from a micro-randomized trial (MRT). This is a video of the webinar that Methodology Center Principal Investigator Susan Murphy presented on Thursday, September 6, 2018. The video includes both the presentation and the question-and-answer session that followed. This is the second of two webinars on the MRT. Watch the first video before watching this one. These recordings are a great way to learn the basics of the MRT.

In an MRT, individuals are randomized hundreds or thousands of times over the course of the study. The goal of these trials is to assess the proximal, in-the-moment, impact of interventions (e.g., interventions that are intended to impact behavior over small time intervals). Through MRTs we can gather data to build optimized mHealth interventions.

Watch our website and eNews for information about upcoming 1 & 1 webinars.

Download the presentation slides.

Watch the video on YouTube.

Free Webinar on Micro-Randomized Trials (Part 2)

August 13, 2018:susanm

Join our next 1 & 1 workshop, when Methodology Center Investigator Susan Murphy will present “Analyzing data from a micro-randomized trial (MRT).” 1 & 1 workshops consist of a one-hour live video presentation on a method followed by a one-hour question-and-answer session with the presenter. The workshop will be held on Thursday, September 6, from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time. This webinar is a follow up to the webinar that Susan presented on June 14, 2018. For anyone who did not attend Susan’s first MRT workshop, we suggest watching the video of that webinar before joining us on September 6.

In an MRT, individuals are randomized hundreds or thousands of times over the course of a study. The goal of these trials is to optimize  mobile health interventions by assessing the effect of intervention components and assessing whether the intervention component effects vary with time or the individuals current context. Through MRTs we can gather data to build optimized just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs). JITAIs are a type of adaptive intervention that can be delivered exactly when and where it is needed using smartphones and other mobile devices for their sensors and ability to communicate with patients.

The 1 & 1 will be hosted via Zoom webinar at https://psu.zoom.us/j/644882707. Contact mchelpdesk@psu.edu if you are unable to logon at the time of the workshop. We hope you will join us.

Video: Webinar on Micro-Randomized Trials (MRTs)

July 25, 2018:

Thanks to all who participated in our 1 & 1 workshop on the micro-randomized trial (MRT). This is a video of the webinar that Methodology Center Principal Investigator Susan Murphy presented on Thursday, June 14, 2018. The video includes both the presentation and the question-and-answer session that followed. This recording is a great way to learn the basics of the MRT.

In an MRT, individuals are randomized hundreds or thousands of times over the course of the study. The goal of these trials is to assess the proximal, in-the-moment, impact of interventions (e.g., interventions that are intended to impact behavior over small time intervals). Through MRTs we can gather data to build optimized mHealth interventions.

Our next 1 & 1 workshop will be on Thursday, September 6, from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time. Susan Murphy will present “Analyzing Data From an MRT.” For anyone who did not attend Susan’s first MRT workshop, we suggest watching the video before attending the webinar on September 6.

Watch the video on YouTube.

Free, Two-Hour, Online Workshop on Micro-Randomized Trials

April 10, 2018:susanm

For our next 1 & 1 workshop, Methodology Center Investigator Susan Murphy will present an introduction to the micro-randomized trial (MRT). 1 & 1 workshops consist of a one-hour live video presentation on a method followed by a one-hour question-and-answer session with the presenter. After the presentation, Susan will accept questions via instant message and answer them live. The workshop will be held on Thursday, June 14, from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

In an MRT, individuals are randomized hundreds or thousands of times over the course of a study. The goal of these trials is to assess the proximal, in-the-moment, impact of interventions (e.g., interventions that are intended to impact behavior over small time intervals). Through MRTs we can gather data to build optimized just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs). A JITAI is a special type of adaptive intervention that can be delivered exactly when and where it is needed using smartphones and other mobile devices for their sensors and ability to communicate with patients.

The 1 & 1 will be hosted via Zoom webinar at https://psu.zoom.us/j/992577418. The workshop can accommodate up to 500 participants, so all interested people should be able to attend. If you try to attend the workshop but are unable to log on for any reason, please send an email to mchelpdesk@psu.edu. We hope you will join us.

Susan Murphy Receives PMWC Luminary Award

March 14, 2018:
susanm

Congratulations to Methodology Center Investigator Susan Murphy, recipient of the 2018 Luminary Award from the Precision Medicine World Conference (PMWC). The PMWC Luminary Award recognizes researchers “who have accelerated personalized medicine into the clinical marketplace.” Susan is being recognized for “innovative data science methods to improve patient care through mobile health in chronic disease,” specifically her work on micro-randomized trials and just-in-time adaptive interventions.

The PMWC was established in 2009. The goal of the conference is to bring experts in different areas of precision medicine together to promote “cross-functional collaboration to further the adoption of personalized medicine in the clinic.” Susan will receive the award at PMWC 2018 Michigan on June 7, 2018.

Just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs) are a special type of adaptive intervention where—thanks to mobile technology like activity sensors and smartphones—an intervention can be delivered when and where it is needed. Susan and her collaborators are developing data-analytic methods for constructing decision rules that allow researchers to build better adaptive interventions and JITAIs. The micro-randomized trial is an innovative research design that is useful for constructing JITAIs.

Read PMWC’s brief question & answer session with Susan.

Read more about Susan’s work on methods for adaptive interventions.