Podcast: Getting Started in Grant Writing With Lisa Dierker

Lisa Dierker

August 28,2019:

In the current research landscape, researchers need to develop grant writing skills. In this podcast, Methodology Center Investigator and Professor of Psychology at Wesleyan University Lisa Dierker discusses topics including how to learn what works in grant writing, the best funding mechanisms, and how to approach grant writing as a methodologist or applied researcher. This podcast is intended for graduate students and junior investigators, but there are tips for more senior researchers as well.

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Timeline
00:00 – Introductions
00:54 – Lisa’s background in research and grant writing
03:15 – The value of rejected grants
09:26 – Lisa’s favorite funding mechanisms
16:08 – How to get started in grant writing
19:45 – Whom to contact while preparing a grant
25:16 – How applied scientists can incorporate innovative methods into grant writing
28:48 – How methodologists can successfully get their work funded
31:15 – Pursuing grants in a difficult funding environment
34:15 – Top 3 pieces of advice on grant writing

Podcast: Social Network Analysis With Ashton Verdery

October 10, 2018:AV
In our latest podcast, Ashton Verdery, assistant professor of sociology and demography at Penn State, discusses social network analysis (SNA). One increasingly important use of SNA is to study marginalized populations who are otherwise hard to sample. In health, behavioral, and social sciences, SNA has been used to examine how people relate to one another; how relationships affect the flow of items such as diseases, goods, information, or behaviors; how individual positions in broader network structures affect the risks of contracting diseases, hearing of opportunities, or generating new ideas; and more. In this podcast, Ashton explains the value and challenges of SNA in a behavioral health context. He also discusses projects from his research, including his work studying the heroin crisis in Pennsylvania, kidney transplant candidates, and migrant populations.

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Timeline

00:00 – Introduction
00:31 – What is social network analysis (SNA) and why do it?
03:51 – Why does SNA interest you?
05:46 – Why is SNA valuable in behavioral health?
09:00 – Do policy changes affect migrants’ social networks?
13:15 – What are the methodological challenges in SNA?
19:17 – How are the social network questions different and similar in your research projects on kidney transplants and your research on the heroin crisis?

Audiobook Excerpt: Preface to Linda Collins’ Book on MOST

May 17,2018:lmc

In this special edition podcast, Methodology Center Director Linda Collins reads the preface to her new book from Springer, Optimization of Behavioral, Biobehavioral, and Biomedical Interventions: The Multiphase Optimization Strategy (MOST). MOST is an engineering-based framework for optimizing interventions, developed by Linda and her collaborators over the past 14 years. In the preface, Linda explains the problem with the current state of intervention research and describes what MOST is and how it can help us address the problem. Then, she explains the content of the book. For researchers who are interested in optimizing interventions, this podcast succinctly introduces the need for and advantages of MOST; the podcast will enable listeners to decide whether to read the entire book.

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Reference 

Collins, L. M. (2018). Optimization of behavioral, biobehavioral, and biomedical Interventions: The multiphase optimization strategy (MOST). New York, NY: Springer. Visit Springer’s website.

Podcast: New Book on MOST With Linda Collins

February 26, 2018:lc18
In this podcast, Methodology Center Director Linda Collins discusses her new book from Springer, Optimization of Behavioral, Biobehavioral, and Biomedical Interventions: The Multiphase Optimization Strategy (MOST). MOST is an engineering-based framework for optimizing interventions that has been developed by Linda and her collaborators over the past 14 years. In the podcast, she describes how MOST can help advance intervention research. She then explains the structure of MOST, using an example from an intervention to help overweight adults lose weight. Finally, she discusses why now is the right time for this book to be published.

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Timeline

00:00 – Introduction
00:50 – The problem with the status quo in intervention design
03:04 – Defining “optimization” and “MOST”
06:57 – Describing the phases of MOST
07:39 – The preparation phase
11:26 – The optimization phase
15:54 – The evaluation phase
19:22 – How Linda’s thinking about MOST has evolved
21:23 – Why is now the right time for this book?


References for the Book and the Articles Discussed in the Podcast

Collins, L. M. (2018). Optimization of behavioral, biobehavioral, and biomedical Interventions: The multiphase optimization strategy (MOST). New York, NY: Springer.

Pellegrini, C. A., Hoffman, S. A., Collins, L. M., & Spring, B. (2014). Optimization of remotely delivered intensive lifestyle treatment for obesity using the multiphase optimization strategy: Opt-IN study protocol. Contemporary Clinical Trials, 38(2), 251-259.

Pellegrini, C. A., Hoffman, S. A., Collins, L. M., & Spring, B. (2015). Corrigendum to “Optimization of remotely delivered intensive lifestyle treatment for obesity using the multiphase optimization strategy: Opt-IN study protocol.” Contemporary Clinical Trials, 45, 468-469.

Podcast: Michael Russell on Ambulatory Assessment

January 23, 2017:Mrussell

In our latest podcast, Methodology Center Research Associate Michael Russell discusses ambulatory assessment and his pilot project examining self-report data during heavy drinking. In the project, Michael is combining ecological momentary assessment (EMA) of self-reported alcohol use with continuous data from ankle bracelets that measure alcohol intoxication levels through contact with the skin. He is investigating the accuracy of using EMA self-reports as a proxy for such intoxication measures during real-world drinking episodes. He discusses his thoughts on the challenges and opportunities of such data collection, and talks about some of his research using these and other intensive longitudinal data (ILD).

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00:00  Introduction

00:33  Developing an interest in methods

03:07  Ambulatory assessments for understanding substance use

06:29  Examining the accuracy of self-report data on alcohol use

08:30  Practical issues with ambulatory assessment studies

10:09  Methodological issues with ambulatory assessment studies

13:36  Implications for working with IRBs

15:40  Future of ambulatory assessment